About

The Lone Twin Network is a voluntary support group run by and for twinless twins, over the age of 18, whose loss has occurred at or around birth, in childhood or during adulthood.

We are a UK based group but also have many members from all over the world.

Through meetings and personal contact, we aim to offer a friendly and comfortable environment in which to talk openly and honestly about how it feels to be without your twin. You will find there is a wide variety of experiences and circumstances of loss within the members of the group – please remember, you are not alone.

Update: August 2020 – In recent years it has become increasingly difficult and emotionally heartbreaking to turn away lone twins whose twin had died in utero. For the past year or so we considered admitting lone twins into the Network if their twin had died in the last trimester of pregnancy; this did not work as in many cases the surviving twin did not know when the loss occurred and even if they did it was unfair to draw a line that decreed that at 185 days you could not become a member of The Lone Twin Network but at 186 days you could. It was therefore decided at the last committee meeting that any surviving twin who was over the age of 18 could be eligible for membership if they had lost their twin at any stage in utero or later in life.

As we come to know each other through the meetings and network list, we will find mutual support. Some may wish to examine ways of increasing awareness of this profound and unique loss, so that those affected – both lone twins and those related to them – will be able to cope more easily and with greater understanding. We endeavour to help ease the pain of loss and loneliness that we all feel in some way, during our journey through this particular grief.

The network list is the means by which members can make contact with one another as soon as they join the Network. As well as the name and general location, it gives details of the sex of their twin, whether or not they were identical and the age at which their twin died. Additional space is provided for other information which surviving twins may wish to add. Any twin wishing to contact another is free to do so, but there is no obligation for members to participate in ways other than those they have chosen. For example, email addresses or telephone numbers need not be included in the Network list.

Origins of the Network

Between 1983 and 1986, 219 lone twins replied to an invitation from Joan Woodward, herself a lone twin. to participate in her research project into the response of twins to the death of their twin. The findings were presented at the 1988 International Conference of Twin Studies in Amsterdam and subsequently published in their journal. On February 25 1989, at Queen Charlotte’s Hospital, London, 31 of the lone twins originally interviewed by Joan met together for the first time and found they had a great deal to share with one another. It was a momentous day.

Those present divided into four groups; those whose twin had died at or around the time of birth; members whose twin had died in childhood and those whose twin had died in adult life. A separate group was formed for those whose twin had died in traumatic circumstances. After this initial meeting, Joan Woodward offered to compile a Register of Lone twins. As membership grew, the ‘Lone Twin Network’ was formed, and has continued to evolve to meet the needs of those who have experienced twin bereavement. There are currently over 650 members in the network.

Be Part of Lone Twin Network on Facebook

Members have the opportunity to interact with other Lone Twin Network members in a confidential Facebook group. Once your LTN membership is confirmed, we’ll invite you to join the group. Please note, because of the personal nature of the issues discussed by members, we only offer this opportunity to LTN members and we won’t be able to accept anyone into the Facebook LTN Group membership until we know you via joining the LTN core group.

97 thoughts on “About

    • hello ! I lost my twin sister at four days after our birth , we were born at 26 weeks and it hurts me . I still don’t understand what i had more than her and survived
      Mostly for me its loneliness most of the time im with my own company but in the back of my head i always think what if she was besides me right now maybe i wouldn’t be so lonely .
      Your twin will always be with you keep your head up !!

  1. I lost my twin sister to leukaemia, March 2020, aged 63, at the start of the first lockdown. Only ten people at her funeral, no flowers, no family funeral cars and no wake. Our mum, aged 86 is struggling knowing we didn’t give her a proper send off (as my mum say).
    We saw each other every single day, even worked together.
    I’m struggling knowing that it’ll be me to look after our mum. Whilst it’ll be an honour and privilege, I wanted to share this experience with my twin. I feel that life has let us down.

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